F C.nick's Sketchbook of Balderdashery
hero-confined-in-a-corgi-body:

Hah! That kid just fell off his skateboard.

hero-confined-in-a-corgi-body:

Hah! That kid just fell off his skateboard.

“Burlington Bay, Ontario” (10th of June, 1796) by Elizabeth Simcoe, born September 22nd, 1762.

“Burlington Bay, Ontario” (10th of June, 1796) by Elizabeth Simcoe, born September 22nd, 1762.

“Fairy Tale Castle” (1909) by Mikalojus Konstantinas Čiurlionis, born September 22nd, 1875.

“Fairy Tale Castle” (1909) by Mikalojus Konstantinas Čiurlionis, born September 22nd, 1875.

Monday’s Much-loved Works of Art:  



“Autumn Hillside” (1920) by Franklin Carmichael

Monday’s Much-loved Works of Art:

Autumn Hillside” (1920) by Franklin Carmichael

“Ecce Homo” (1607) by Cigoli, born September 21st, 1559.

Ecce Homo” (1607) by Cigoli, born September 21st, 1559.

That is the only way I ever heard of true research going. I asked a question, devised some method of obtaining an answer, and got — a fresh question. Was this possible or that possible? You cannot imagine what this means to an investigator, what an intellectual passion grows upon him! You cannot imagine the strange, colourless delight of these intellectual desires!

Ch. 14 of “The Island of Doctor Moreau” (1896) by H.G Wells, born September 21st, 1866.

Art Term of the Week

Contour Drawing:

A contour drawing is a drawing that has just lines depicting its subject. The French word contour means “outline”. Through the use of just lines dimension is indicated in the drawing, showing the subject’s form as well as shape. It is an exercise that teaches an artist to focus on shape, form, and mass to convey meaning rather than colour, shading, texture, and fine details.

Art: “Mother with child” (1910) by Egon Schiele

Saturday’s Sketch:





Turn of the Wheel (Morgan & Guinevere) (Work in Progress), C.nick, Graphite, 2014, 11 X 14





I’ve waited a while to do this because I wanted to feel a bit of autumn in the air, to feel the season starting to change, before I started it. The concept is one half of the face is Morgan and the other half is Guinevere. It is almost certain that way back in history Morgan and Guinevere were goddesses in some capacity. Morgan has strong ties to the colder months and Guinevere has strong ties to fertility and thus the warmer months. So this depicts the seasons and the transitioning of the year that these two women represent.

Saturday’s Sketch:

Turn of the Wheel (Morgan & Guinevere) (Work in Progress), C.nick, Graphite, 2014, 11 X 14

I’ve waited a while to do this because I wanted to feel a bit of autumn in the air, to feel the season starting to change, before I started it. The concept is one half of the face is Morgan and the other half is Guinevere. It is almost certain that way back in history Morgan and Guinevere were goddesses in some capacity. Morgan has strong ties to the colder months and Guinevere has strong ties to fertility and thus the warmer months. So this depicts the seasons and the transitioning of the year that these two women represent.

All art is propaganda. It is universally and inescapably propaganda; sometimes unconsciously, but often deliberately, propaganda.
“Mammonart - an Essay in Economic Interpretation Ch. 2 Who Owns the Artists?” (1925) by Upton Sinclair, born September 20th, 1878.
hero-confined-in-a-corgi-body:

Get up. Mom got us Oreos so wake up! THEY’RE CARAMEL APPLE!

hero-confined-in-a-corgi-body:

Get up. Mom got us Oreos so wake up! THEY’RE CARAMEL APPLE!